Helel ben Sahar

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Helel ben Sahar
Helel ben Sahar NPC.png

RaceOfficially called "Type" in-game. Label Race Unknown.png
GenderGender is a character attribute used for game mechanics. A character's lore, appearance, and other factors do not affect this attribute. Other
Voice Actor Takahiro Sakurai
Unlock
What Makes the Sky Blue III: 000

ID 3991292000
Char ID
NameJP ヘレル・ベン・サハル
Voice ActorJP 櫻井孝宏
Release Date 2019-03-07

Made long ago by the Omnipotent, this being served as his Speaker. He is tasked with spreading the Omnipotent's word throughout the world of mortals. Determined not to interfere in the clash between the sky god and Astral god, he mostly acts as an observer, watching the world play out its own destiny. These days he goes by a different name and occasionally slips into the affairs of skydweller society.

Trivia[edit]

  • Helel ben Sahar is the true identity of the recruitable party member Lucio.
  • According to What Makes The Sky Blue: 000, Helel ben Sahar is functionally like a primal despite not being a creation of the Astrals. This is due to his being the first thing brought into existence by Bahamut upon his creation of the sky realm. This could also serve as an explanation for why the unit Lucio is categorized as a primal while Helel ben Sahar is labeled as unknown.
  • Helel ben Sahar is the precusor to Lucilius with the latter being an imperfect copy created for the Astral world. It is stated in 000 that Helel himself has a precursor, though it has yet to be revealed who that entity is.

Etymology[edit]

  • Helel ben Sahar’s namesake likely stems from the original Hebrew term for the morning star Helel ben Shahar, which is what the planet Venus and the king of Babylon was referred to as in the book of Isaiah before it was transliterated into commonly known name Lucifer from Latin Vulgate and preserved in most old copies of the Bible. The term Helel ben Shahar is said to have only been used once in the entire Old Testament.
  • While noted above that Helel ben Sahar likely stems from its biblical origins, it is unknown if the Sahar is a mistranslation of Shahar as the deity was described or intentionally altered.